It has to be 39 lines.

I need you to write me a Sestina poem from scratch. A sestina is a fixed verse form consisting of six stanzas of six lines each, normally followed by a three-line envoi. The words that end each line of the first stanza are used as line endings in each of the following stanzas, rotated in a set pattern. The sestina is composed of six stanzas of six lines (sixains), followed by a stanza of three lines (a tercet). There is no rhyme within the stanzas; instead the sestina is structured through a recurrent pattern of the words that end each line. IT HAS TO BE 39 LINES. Please follow the pattern of a Sestina and be as creative as possible, must also have a title that needs to be creative.

The book is a textbook called the norton anthology of american literature, shorter 10th edition.

This week, we will begin our study of the Contemporary Period in American literature (approximately 1945-present). Use this assignment to write your weekly reflection journal. In this space, you will reflect on what you are currently reading for the class, including any challenges you may be facing, readings you really enjoy, areas for further exploration, etc. You will use this same space for each week’s journal. Use this assignment to write your weekly reflection journal. In this space, you will reflect on what you are currently reading for the class, including any challenges you may be facing, readings you really enjoy, areas for further exploration, etc. You will use this same space for each week’s journal. Use a minimum of one piece of evidence from the text and/or an outside source, properly cited. The Book is a Textbook called The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter 10th edition. (Two volumes) .
Theodore Roethke, bio, pp. 1131-1132
Theodore Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz,” “The Waking,” p. 1133
Eudora Welty, bio, pp. 1134-1135
Eudora Welty, “Petrified Man,” pp. 1135-1144
Ralph Ellison, bio, pp. 1160-1161
Ralph Ellison, from Invisible Man, pp. 1161-1171
Please answer the following Question in the Journal • 3 takeaways from the readings for the module (any part: the overviews, author bios, or the texts themselves) • 2 words you would use to describe the readings or characteristics of the literary period • 1 question you would like answered
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Major Americans Writers

Have fun!

In Poem 6, I’d like you to write a poem that incorporates slant rhyme (any or all of the ten mentioned in Drury are up for grabs). You do not have to incorporate meter in this poem, i.e. your poem may be written in free verse. But the rhymes should be end rhymes, not internal rhymes, and they should occur in a relatively regular pattern, i.e. in quatrains rhyming A-B-A-B or X-A-X-A, etc. There is no restriction on subject matter or theme. Experiment! Have fun!

Write an introduction + literature review and an analysis of the tools that are used in theses 5 poems and conclusion.

*Stylistics*
Essay paper 4 to 5 or more papers
The topic
The Representation of Death in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry: A Stylistic Analysis (at least 5-6 poems)
write an introduction + literature review and an analysis of the tools that are used in theses 5 poems and conclusion.

Explain your answers through specific words and images in the poem.

Read “The Unknown Citizen” (https://poets.org/poem/unknown-citizen) by W. H. Auden and write a critical analysis of it. Focus on:
– The poetic treatment of a contemporary social issue in it
– The evolution of your own understanding and critical outlook on it
– The tone of the poet toward his subject
– The tone of the speaker of the poem toward the “unknown citizen”
Why Do This?
– To practice working with poetry which is a very important literary genre
– To gain an understanding of literary discourse and how it works
While we will pay attention to comprehending the poem as well as its use of literary devices such as rhyme, rhythm, etc., our goal will go beyond to focus on understanding and engaging with a contemporary social issue and hence use poetry as a strong popular culture resource and a source of knowledge on a specific social issue.
Questions & Clues to Analysis:
1. Why doesn’t the “unknown citizen” of the poem have a name? He is identified as only a number.
2. The poem is from a collection of poems by Auden called Another Time published in 1940 coinciding with Nazi Germany and the totalitarian rule associated with it. What significance does this have?
3. The “unknown citizen” is called a “saint” in the “modern sense of an old-fashioned word”. What does that mean?
4. There are reports about the “unknown citizen” by various institutions and communities that provide approval for his character – Bureau of Statistics, The Greater Community, Fudge Motors Inc., Social Psychology, Producers Research, High-Grade Living, Public Opinion. Using the information in the poem, discuss the meaning of this. Do we still experience something similar in our own times? Do you know of any institutions or communities possibly serving the same purpose in our own society?
5. Based on the cultural language and atmosphere of those days, the poem uses a word like “Man” to represent the whole of humanity – male and female. This is both outdated and unacceptable today. However, what the poem focuses on and critiques seems to go beyond culturally limited or dead words. Discuss whether the poem still applies in our own times, and if so, how?
6. The speaker of the poem talks about marriage, having children, freedom, and happiness with specific reference to the “unknown citizen”. What does all this say about modern life according to the poem? Do you think our own society is so structured as to produce “unknown citizens”?
7. Discuss irony in relation to specific examples in the poem.
The Task:
– Choose THREE of the above questions and write one regular-sized (150-200 words) paragraph on each of them. So, you will write three paragraphs altogether. Clearly indicate which questions you have selected to answer. In your paragraphs, make sure to:
o Avoid generalizations and abstract or vague statements. Explain your answers through specific words and images in the poem.
o Focus on a logical progression or movement in your argument in the sense of having a clear introduction, body, and conclusion.
o Historicize your response in the sense of travelling back and forth between the time of the poem and our times today in order to obtain a more concrete view or understanding of the ideas treated in the poem. There are many analyses and discussions of this famous poem available for you look up. What matters, however, is what you get from the poem and take away with you.
o Focus on good grammar and sentence structure, and pay attention to mechanics-related issues: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc.
The Format:
– Double-space paragraphs
– Use 12 pt New Times Roman font
– Submit a Word file

What motivates you?

The readings this week are attached for reference points. Here is a great podcast for visionary Imagination https://www.buzzsprout.com/438814/3147694
In social change work, we can sometimes get tired. One way to maintain positivity as the work bogs us down or the politics look pessimistic is to remind ourselves of why we do the work. What motivates you? How would you fill in the following sentences:
I have a VISION for a better world. It looks like…
I have VALUES that guide me in my activism. They are…
I HOPE to change the world. What makes me feel hopeful is…
Please see below for my written response to the questions above. For hope, I started a draft poem (words that came to me). Pleabcise feel free to revise.

Delve into the message, the meaning and look for themes and always respond to particular points that grab your attention and give you that ah hah moment.

We have read many poems and I realize that some of you find them daunting to analyze. Forget that they are poems and get past their form. Delve into the message, the meaning and look for themes and always respond to particular points that grab your attention and give you that ah hah moment. That’s where the essay is and as with any essay, you frame an argument about the poem and use the poem itself to prove your points by quoting or referencing it. As always with essays, a 1250 word minimum.
feel free to wribcite your own prompt for poetry.

This week our discussion post focuses on using the elements of poetic form, rhythm, and rhyme to analyze literature and interpret sonnets.

This week our discussion post focuses on using the elements of Poetic form, Rhythm, and Rhyme to analyze literature and interpret sonnets. See attached discussion description.