What category was it at landfall?

For this project you will be writing a report about the tropical cyclone of your choice.
Your report should be written in Times New Roman font, double spaced, and at least 600 words in length.
Include your name, the assignment number and name, and the date on the first page.
Submit your report as a Word document.
3. Choose a tropical cyclone that made landfall on an island or continent to research:
Write a report about your chosen tropical cyclone. Include answers to the following questions and anything else that you find interesting/important:
What was the name of the tropical cyclone, and where and when did it originate?
How far did it travel before making landfall? What category was it at landfall? Where was landfall?
Give details such as horizontal size at landfall, barometric pressure, wind speeds, and rainfall amounts.
Include as many pictures of the event as you like. Although pictures are not required, they will get you bonus points.
Write a paragraph that tells a real life story from your hurricane. This can be a personal account or one reported by the media.
Conclude with your impression after researching this storm. What do you think you would do if you lived an a area prone to tropical cyclones such as the one that you researched? Would you evacuate or try to stay and protect your property? What could you do to be prepared?

Write a poem about something in nature.

Rationale:
To help us develop the habits of professional writers, we will keep nature journals this semester.
Most writers keep journals, and nature writers tend to be especially obsessive journal writers. In their journals, nature writers “think on paper” about their observations of the natural world, reflect upon their experiences, and explore their ideas. Your nature journal is a way for you to play with ideas and to play with writing. Your journal is a place to make and find your own meaning. I hope that this playful work will turn into a personal quarry that you can mine for class discussion and essays.
Requirements:
Each week, you will be required to write a journal entry of about 1 page). Your journal topics might arise from your own nature observations, issues in sustainability, and ideas from the reading and class discussion; Journal Entries #4-#10, Journals are by their nature informal and personal. You can write in stream of consciousness and sentence fragments, if you wish. A journal is a place to explore ideas and experiment with writing. Issues of copyediting certainly apply in our major essays, but they are irrelevant, perhaps even counterproductive, in a journal. In other words, don’t worry about spelling, commas, sentence structure in your journals. Just think and express yourself on paper. Live in the moment on the paper.
Evaluation:
An A journal will have 10 full entries and consistently meets standards of high engagement, including vivid, detailed descriptions and imaginative treatment of ideas.
A B journal is generally detailed, thoughtful, and imaginative but may be missing 1-2 entries, or be somewhat brief and underdeveloped, and/or demonstrate occasional lapses in quality.
A C level journal shows some engagement but may be missing several entries, be overly brief and underdeveloped or be inconsistent in quality
A D level journal shows a lack of effort at serious engagement, whether in terms of missing, overly brief and/or undeveloped entries.
An F journal is either missing more than 4 entries and/or has too many problems to warrant a passing grade.
The evaluation is made of your final journal, taken as a whole portfolio. If, prior to that time, you wish me to look at any of your journal entries, possibly as the germ from which to develop a subsequent essay, I will be happy to do so.
Some Random Ideas to Use, Modify, or Reject for Journal Writing:
Respond to an idea from class discussion or reading. Annotating the readings is a great place to start.
Respond to a current issue in the news related to nature/sustainability—even if it doesn’t at first seem related to nature. After all, most issues do impact the natural world, but we have been trained to separate “nature” from our daily lives. In your journal, you can make connections, retrain your mind.
Observe and look closely at a leaf, a squirrel, a tree, a flower—whatever object or animal you can see outside. Describe it as carefully as possible; you could even sketch it.
Think about a way, either extreme or small, that you could reduce your ecological impact. How would it affect you and affect the planet? Could you give up driving? How is your idea realistic or unrealistic?
Try to copy the sentence patterns in different paragraphs of an essay that you liked. Put your own thoughts into someone else’s sentence structure. Or try to begin your own essay based upon another author’s organizational structure. Play with form and structure.
Go crazy with alliteration, metaphor, similes. Practice dialogue. Push flashbacks to the extreme. Write the longest sentence you can. Then write the shortest.
Write a poem about something in nature.
Walk in the woods, in the park, or just down the street and let your thoughts ramble as you ramble. Then ramble on about it in your journal.
Go to the grocery store, the mall, the cafeteria, the parking lot, the movie theater, the gym. Describe the people and places you see. How are these places and people connected and disconnected from the natural world?
In “Buckeye,” Scott Russell Sanders argues that we need art to give value to the natural world. What music, novels, poetry, articles, movies, or paintings have made you think about or appreciate the natural world in some way?
What’s the most beautiful (or ugly) natural area you have observed on campus? In Berea? In Ohio? What specifically makes it beautiful or ugly?
“All the thoughts of a turtle are turtle,” Emerson wrote in his journal. What does a turtle think? What do you think about what Emerson thinks about what turtles think?
If you had to choose a totemic animal that exemplifies you in some way, or for which you feel a special spiritual connection, or which you could envision as a spirit guide, which animal would it be, and why?
You can think of your own journal ideas that will be much better than my ideas.
Wash, rinse, repeat any of the above.
Choose a submission type

Write a poem about something in nature.

Rationale:
To help us develop the habits of professional writers, we will keep nature journals this semester.
Most writers keep journals, and nature writers tend to be especially obsessive journal writers. In their journals, nature writers “think on paper” about their observations of the natural world, reflect upon their experiences, and explore their ideas. Your nature journal is a way for you to play with ideas and to play with writing. Your journal is a place to make and find your own meaning. I hope that this playful work will turn into a personal quarry that you can mine for class discussion and essays.
Requirements:
Each week, you will be required to write a journal entry of about 1 page). Your journal topics might arise from your own nature observations, issues in sustainability, and ideas from the reading and class discussion; Journal Entries #4-#10, Journals are by their nature informal and personal. You can write in stream of consciousness and sentence fragments, if you wish. A journal is a place to explore ideas and experiment with writing. Issues of copyediting certainly apply in our major essays, but they are irrelevant, perhaps even counterproductive, in a journal. In other words, don’t worry about spelling, commas, sentence structure in your journals. Just think and express yourself on paper. Live in the moment on the paper.
Evaluation:
An A journal will have 10 full entries and consistently meets standards of high engagement, including vivid, detailed descriptions and imaginative treatment of ideas.
A B journal is generally detailed, thoughtful, and imaginative but may be missing 1-2 entries, or be somewhat brief and underdeveloped, and/or demonstrate occasional lapses in quality.
A C level journal shows some engagement but may be missing several entries, be overly brief and underdeveloped or be inconsistent in quality
A D level journal shows a lack of effort at serious engagement, whether in terms of missing, overly brief and/or undeveloped entries.
An F journal is either missing more than 4 entries and/or has too many problems to warrant a passing grade.
The evaluation is made of your final journal, taken as a whole portfolio. If, prior to that time, you wish me to look at any of your journal entries, possibly as the germ from which to develop a subsequent essay, I will be happy to do so.
Some Random Ideas to Use, Modify, or Reject for Journal Writing:
Respond to an idea from class discussion or reading. Annotating the readings is a great place to start.
Respond to a current issue in the news related to nature/sustainability—even if it doesn’t at first seem related to nature. After all, most issues do impact the natural world, but we have been trained to separate “nature” from our daily lives. In your journal, you can make connections, retrain your mind.
Observe and look closely at a leaf, a squirrel, a tree, a flower—whatever object or animal you can see outside. Describe it as carefully as possible; you could even sketch it.
Think about a way, either extreme or small, that you could reduce your ecological impact. How would it affect you and affect the planet? Could you give up driving? How is your idea realistic or unrealistic?
Try to copy the sentence patterns in different paragraphs of an essay that you liked. Put your own thoughts into someone else’s sentence structure. Or try to begin your own essay based upon another author’s organizational structure. Play with form and structure.
Go crazy with alliteration, metaphor, similes. Practice dialogue. Push flashbacks to the extreme. Write the longest sentence you can. Then write the shortest.
Write a poem about something in nature.
Walk in the woods, in the park, or just down the street and let your thoughts ramble as you ramble. Then ramble on about it in your journal.
Go to the grocery store, the mall, the cafeteria, the parking lot, the movie theater, the gym. Describe the people and places you see. How are these places and people connected and disconnected from the natural world?
In “Buckeye,” Scott Russell Sanders argues that we need art to give value to the natural world. What music, novels, poetry, articles, movies, or paintings have made you think about or appreciate the natural world in some way?
What’s the most beautiful (or ugly) natural area you have observed on campus? In Berea? In Ohio? What specifically makes it beautiful or ugly?
“All the thoughts of a turtle are turtle,” Emerson wrote in his journal. What does a turtle think? What do you think about what Emerson thinks about what turtles think?
If you had to choose a totemic animal that exemplifies you in some way, or for which you feel a special spiritual connection, or which you could envision as a spirit guide, which animal would it be, and why?
You can think of your own journal ideas that will be much better than my ideas.
Wash, rinse, repeat any of the above.
Choose a submission type

Submit your report as a word document.

For this project you will be writing a report about a volcano of your choice.
Your report should be written in Times New Roman font, double spaced, and at least 750 words in length.
Include your name, the assignment number and name, and the date on the first page.
Feel free to include articles, stories and pictures about your volcano. The articles, stories and pictures do not count in the 750 words, but will count as extra credit
if included. If you include a URL from the internet please insert it as a link.
Make sure you cite and reference any sources that you use, including the textbook.
Submit your report as a Word document.

Submit your report as a word document.

For this project you will be writing a report about a volcano of your choice.
Your report should be written in Times New Roman font, double spaced, and at least 750 words in length.
Include your name, the assignment number and name, and the date on the first page.
Feel free to include articles, stories and pictures about your volcano. The articles, stories and pictures do not count in the 750 words, but will count as extra credit
if included. If you include a URL from the internet please insert it as a link.
Make sure you cite and reference any sources that you use, including the textbook.
Submit your report as a Word document.

Write a 3-5 paged paper (excluding the title page and references) on a specific disaster.

Write a 3-5 paged paper (excluding the title page and references) on a specific disaster. Examples include:
Earthquake
Tsunami
Tornado
Flood
Fire
Winter Storm
Heat-related Disaster
Volcanic Eruption
Avalanche
Disease epidemic or pandemic
Bioterrorism
Nuclear event
You must address in your paper the following:
1) What issues in this disaster would make triaging of victims a challenge?
2) What Public Health issues may ensue (e.g., infectious disease outbreaks) and what can we do to mitigate
the events?
3) How can interagency cooperation and local collaboration be effectively utilized?
Your paper should adhere to APA expectations and must include a cover page, an introduction, the body, a
well-defined conclusion, and a reference page. Your paper must include at least 5 scholarly references
(no Wikipedia!). References should be scholarly peer reviewed journal articles, official reports or from other
reading resources.