How do the theories and concepts of settler colonial studies apply to california?

How do the theories and concepts of Settler Colonial Studies apply to California? Please provide examples from the course material only.
1-inch margins, 12pt. – Times New Roman, Double-Spaced, Word Doc or PDF submissions only, Identifying information (i.e. Name, Dates, Course Name, etc. must stay in the header and footer – please see the attached image for reference). Works Cited page is optional, but you must you in-text citations in parentheses after a passage where you quote or reference course material – ex. (source).

When was the bracero program created and how long did it last?

Watch Film: Harvest of LonelinessLinks to an external site.
Complete and submit worksheet questions
Topic: Labor, Immigration and the Bracero Program
Documentary: Harvest of Loneliness
Instructions: Read the questions below prior to watching the documentary. As you are watching take notes on the following for future reference.
When was the Bracero program created and how long did it last?
What historical event took place that influenced the bi-national program?
Why were Mexican-Americans in the U.S. challenging this worker program?
What is the estimated number of workers that were recruited over the life of the program?
Who was Ernesto Galarza and what was his contribution to the Bracero program?
What the process to become a Bracero? List at least 2 specific references from the film.
What were some of the selection criteria use to approve workers?
What were some of the working conditions that the Braceros endured?
Were the Bracero contracts honored? What were some of the implications of these contracts?
What were some of the long term effects on the Braceros? (Financially, Physically, Socially, Emotionally) [must offer complete examples]

How has race, gender, sexuality, and/ or class played a persistent factor in dictating who belongs in this country and who does not?

How has race, gender, sexuality, and/ or class played a persistent factor in dictating who belongs in this country and who does not?
1-inch margins, 12pt. – Times New Roman, Double-Spaced, Word Doc or PDF submissions only, Identifying information (i.e. Name, Dates, Course Name, etc. must stay in the header and footer – please see the attached image for reference). Works Cited page is optional, but you must you in-text citations in parentheses after a passage where you quote or reference course material – ex. (source).

Given the interdisciplinary nature of the field, courses draw from a variety of disciplines such as literature, history, sociology and cultural studies.

Ethnic Studies as a field of studies emerged in late sixties and early seventies in response to claims by university students that traditional disciplines did not include the study of the experiences of ethnic “minorities.” Given the interdisciplinary nature of the field, courses draw from a variety of disciplines such as literature, history, sociology and cultural studies. The deep and broad focus of the discipline not only prepares students for understanding the experiences of the various racialized minorities in the Unites States, but also helps them understand and examine American society at large, as well as the important continuities and commonalities across other national and racial boundaries. The faculty of Ethnic Studies at Oregon State University have a deep commitment to social justice; hence, this ideal is central to their teaching philosophies and practices.

However, essays that are excessively short or that do not show good faith engagement with the texts and the prompt may receive only partial credit.

To substitute for discussion section absence the week of 10/31-11/3:
Please write a short essay that responds to the following prompt:
With reference to the texts listed below, what does objectivity mean, and why is it important to democracy?
Although there is no fixed word length for the essay, for full credit you should write for at least 1.5 hours–the equivalent of the time you would have spent in your discussion section. Not everyone writes at the same speed, so the length and quality may vary. However, essays that are excessively short or that do not show good faith engagement with the texts and the prompt may receive only partial credit.
Required texts to discuss:
T. Porter, Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life (Princeton University Press, 1995) Chapter 4, “The Political Philosophy of Quantification,” pp. 73-86.
danah boyd, “You Think You Want Media Literacy: Do You?”Links to an external site. Medium, March 9, 2018.
Gideon Lewis-Kraus, “How Harmful is Social Media?”Actions The New Yorker, June 3rd, 2022 [Original link to websiteLinks to an external site.]

Please copy the following “reading notes form” (links to an external site.)

Please copy the following “Reading Notes Form” (Links to an external site.) into a new document and fill it out for each of the assigned readings for the week. Submit as a single Word or PDF document. Due the night before your section at midnight (so, if your section meets on Tuesdays, for example, your reading notes will be due each Monday before midnight).
Readings:
Z. Tufekci, Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest, (Yale University Press, 2017) Chapter 1, “A Networked Public” pp. 3-27
Evictor Structures: Erin McElroy and Azad Amir-Ghassemi on Fighting DisplacementLinks to an external site., Logic Magazine, December 20, 2020
Steven Weber and Richmond Y. Wong, “The new world of data: Four provocations on the Internet of Things” First Monday, February 6, 2017.

Why does that matter for statistical practice today?

Please write a short essay that responds to the following prompt:
What links together modern state power, statistics, and eugenics? Why does that matter for statistical practice today? In your answer, please refer to both the relevant texts and lectures.
Although there is no fixed word length for the essay, for full credit you should write for at least 1.5 hours–the equivalent of the time you would have spent in your discussion section. Not everyone writes at the same speed, so the length and quality may vary. However, essays that are excessively short or that do not show good faith engagement with the texts and the prompt may receive only partial credit.
Due before section the week following your absence (10/23-10/27)
Required texts to discuss:
James C. Scott, Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998), [selections] Ch. 1 (“Nature and Space”) and Ch. 3 (“Authoritarian High Modernism”) pp. 22-33, 87-102.
Aubrey Clayton, “How Eugenics Shaped Statistics,” Nautilus, October 28, 2020.