Then write 1 page reading reflection on these topics and how this new information informs your understanding of these topics and larger society.

For this activity, you are to read chapter 5 in On African American Rhetoric and make not of two topics that are of particular interest to you. Then write 1 page reading reflection on these topics and how this new information informs your understanding of these topics and larger society.

Which thou owedst yesterday.

Write an essay of no more than 1500 words in continuous prose on the passage. You should consider the following:
Why the passage is important
The distinctive features of its language
Two ways in which the distinctive features of the language could be translated into performance.
Othello
Act 3 Scene 3
DESDEMONA
How now, my dear Othello?
Your dinner, and the generous islanders
By you invited, do attend your presence.
OTHELLO I am to blame.
DESDEMONA Why do you speak so faintly? 285
Are you not well?
OTHELLO I have a pain upon my forehead, here.
DESDEMONA Faith, that’s with watching: ’twill away again.
Let me but bind it hard, within this hour
It will be well.
OTHELLO
Your napkin is too little.
290
She drops her handkerchief
Let it alone. Come, I’ll go in with you.
DESDEMONA
I am very sorry that you are not well.
Exeunt Othello and Desdemona
EMILIA I am glad I have found this napkin:
This was her first remembrance from the Moor;
My wayward husband hath a hundred times 295
Wooed me to steal it; but she so loves the token—
For he conjured her she should ever keep it—
That she reserves it evermore about her
To kiss and talk to. I’ll have the work ta’en out,
And give’t Iago: what he will do with it 300
Heaven knows, not I—
I nothing, but to please his fantasy.
Enter Iago
IAGO How now? What do you here alone?
EMILIA Do not you chide: I have a thing for you.
IAGO You have a thing for me? It is a common thing— 305
EMILIA Hah?
IAGO To have a foolish wife.
EMILIA O, is that all? What will you give me now
For that same handkerchief?
IAGO What handkerchief?
EMILIA What handkerchief? 310
Why that the Moor first gave to Desdemona,
That which so often you did bid me steal.
IAGO Hast stolen it from her?
EMILIA No, faith, she let it drop by negligence,
And, to th’advantage, I being here took’t up: 315
Look, here it is.
IAGO
A good wench! Give it me.
[He snatches it]
EMILIA What will you do with it, that you have been
So earnest to have me filch it?
IAGO Why, what’s that to you?
EMILIA If it be not for some purpose of import,
Give’t me again. Poor lady, she’ll run mad 320
When she shall lack it.
IAGO Be not acknown on’t:
I have use for it. Go, leave me.
Exit Emilia
I will in Cassio’s lodging lose this napkin,
And let him find it. Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong 325
As proofs of holy writ. This may do something.
The Moor already changes with my poison:
Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons,
Which at the first are scarce found to distaste,
But, with a little act upon the blood, 330
Burn like the mines of sulphur. I did say so.
Enter Othello
Look where he comes. Not poppy, nor mandragora,
Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world
Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
Which thou owedst yesterday.
(Act 3, Scene 3, pp. 299–302; ll. 282–335)
Guidance notes
This assignment is an exercise in close textual analysis, so you should begin by reading the subsection ‘Textual analysis’ in Section 4.2 of this Assessment Guide.
There are three parts to this question, but make sure you present your TMA as an essay written in continuous prose; that is, although your TMA will inevitably fall into three sections, you should not number them or include sub-headings.
Consider carefully how much space you allocate to each part of the question. With the first part – identifying why the passage is important – avoid just telling the story of the play. Think about why the passage is important; what dramatic function does it serve? Where does the extract occur in the play and in what way is it significant for the play as a whole? It is important to present this first section clearly and concisely.
You will want to spend most of your time considering the second part of the assignment: the distinctive features of the language. Here you will find it useful to go back to Chapters 1 and 2 of The Renaissance and Long Eighteenth Century and remind yourself of the different aspects of Shakespeare’s language examined there. Then re-read the extract carefully, and think about the use of, for example, metre and rhythm, sound patterns, registers of language, imagery and figurative language. You may feel after studying the passage that there are other features that should be mentioned, but remember that your tutor does not want a simple list of poetic and linguistic devices. You should not only identify the distinctive qualities of the language but also say why you think the passage is written in this particular way. What effect is created by Shakespeare’s use of particular poetic techniques? How do these contribute to his creation of character? How does the language of the extract help to create and convey particular meanings?
After discussing the distinctive features of the language and the ways in which this shapes the meanings of the extract, try to identify TWO ways in which this could be translated into performance. For example, if the language of the passage creates a particular mood or tone, how would you try to get this across to the audience if you were staging the play? You might think about lighting, or about how the actors’ delivery of the lines could help to convey the mood of the scene. If the language works to evoke a particular character’s personality or emotions, how would you go about conveying those to the audience through performance? How might the position and movement of the characters on the stage underline the meanings created by the language of the passage? Does the mood or tone change at any point? Does the language contain clues about how the passage should be performed? Are there any dramatic pauses or sudden breaks in the rhythm? You will find it helpful to watch the video ‘Othello: from text to performance’ again for specific guidance on performance issues.
Your job is to focus on what the language itself tells us about how the passage should be performed. Remember that you only need to identify TWO ways in which the meaning of the extract might be related through performance, so the bulk of your TMA should be devoted to the analysis of the language.
You were advised to study the ‘Skills tutorial: drama’ in the opening weeks of A230, so please make sure you have worked through this material carefully before beginning your preparation for this TMA.

What significant similarities and differences can you find between the use the two passages make of literary devices?

Write an essay analysing and comparing the two passages. What significant similarities and differences can you find between the use the two passages make of literary devices?
Passage A: Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd
Passage B: Edith Wharton, The Custom of the Country.
Structure your answer as one continuous answer, not as two separate mini-essays.
Your essay should be no more than 2000 words.

What about socioeconomics?

Compare the character journeys of Lizzie in Pride and Prejudice and Esther in Bleak House. Compare and contrast their relationships, gender roles, and social statuses. What is the role of marriage in their lives and how does it solve or create problems? What about socioeconomics? How do they exercise autonomy, or do they, and what are the consequences?
You must use at least one secondary source from JSTOR.
In your bid, please confirm that you can access JSTOR, and please briefly describe the angle you’d take or name the article you might use if you have one in mind.
Hard deadline.

Why did shakespeare choose iambic pentameter for his plays?

PLEASE ANSWER 15 QUESTIONS
Question1:
Poets cut up sentences into lines, or small units of words. Groups of lines are called stanzas.
True
or
False
Question 2:
Match the definitions of the various types of stanzas.
_two line stanza 1. Couplet
_four line stanza 2. Triplet
_three line stanza 3. Quatrain
Question 3:
Which of the following are characteristics of stressed and unstressed syllables? Check all that apply.
_English languages are composed of a set of stressed and unstressed syllables
_Some syllables seem to have a long or short sound when they are pronounced. We can call this different syllable emphasis stressed or unstressed.
_Not all spoken word has a rhythm formed by stressed and unstressed syllables.
Question 4:
Within poetry _____ is the pattern of stresses within a line of verse.
A. iamb
B. rhythm
C. Slant rhyme
D. rhyme
Question 5:
Meter in poetry is defined by
A.syllables
B. iambs
C. beat
D. metrical feet
Question 6:
The following are characteristics of iambic pentameter. Check all that apply
_created by metrical feet of one unstressed syllable and one stressed syllable.
_created by metrical feet of two unstressed syllables and one stressed syllable.
_the metrical foot is called an iamb.
_there are five iambs in a line.
Question 7:
The following are characteristics of trochaic tetrameter. Check all that apply
_there are eight feet to a line.
_created by metrical feet of one unstressed syllable and one stressed syllable.
_created by metrical feet of one stressed and one unstressed syllable.
_the metrical foot is called a imab.
Question 8:
Match the literary element with its definition
_patterns of end rhymes 1. Rhyme
_the repetition of syllables 2. End Rhyme
_the repetition of syllables at the end of a line. 3. Rhyme Scheme
Question 9:
Rhyme is important to poetry because
A. It is a defining characteristic of poetry.
B. It is a road sign to sense, to ambiguity, to new possible meanings
C. Once a poet creates a rhyme pattern, they must stick to it.
Question 10:
Read the following stanza:
Not warp’d by passion, awed by rumor;
Not grave through pride, nor gay through folly;
An equal mixture of good-humor
And sensible soft melancholy
This is an example of ________.
A. heroic couplet
B. masculine rhyme
C. feminine rhyme
Question 11:
Rhymes of close parallels of sounds, but not exact sounds are called
A. Slant rhymes
B. masculine rhymes
C. feminine rhymes
Question 12:
English is harder to rhyme, because it tends to emphasize the importance of the first syllable while deemphasizing the importance of the last syllable in words.
True
or
False
Question 13:
Why do poets use alliteration, the repetition of initial sounds?
A. to create a euphonous art, art that makes you, the reader, feel something.
B. to create a grammatical form.
C. to create beginning rhymes, rather than end rhymes.
Question 14:
Read the excerpt from Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Fish”
He hung a grunting weight,
Battered and venerable
and homely. Here and there
his brown skin hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper
The line, “his brown skin hung in strips” is an example of which poetic device?
A. assonance
B. consonance
C. alliteration
D. rhyme
Question 15:
Why did Shakespeare choose iambic pentameter for his plays?
A. It was a popular poetic meter in the time.
B. Iambic pentameter was a difficult poetic meter for English speakers, and his choice shows his mastery of the language.
C. His most poetic lines don’t just talk about the feelings of the heart, they follow the rhythm of the heart.

What about socioeconomics?

Compare the character journeys of Lizzie in Pride and Prejudice and Esther in Bleak House. Compare and contrast their relationships, gender roles, and social statuses. What is the role of marriage in their lives and how does it solve or create problems? What about socioeconomics? How do they exercise autonomy, or do they, and what are the consequences?
You must use at least one secondary source from JSTOR.
In your bid, please confirm that you can access JSTOR, and please briefly describe the angle you’d take or name the article you might use if you have one in mind.
Hard deadline.

Why did shakespeare choose iambic pentameter for his plays?

PLEASE ANSWER 15 QUESTIONS
Question1:
Poets cut up sentences into lines, or small units of words. Groups of lines are called stanzas.
True
or
False
Question 2:
Match the definitions of the various types of stanzas.
_two line stanza 1. Couplet
_four line stanza 2. Triplet
_three line stanza 3. Quatrain
Question 3:
Which of the following are characteristics of stressed and unstressed syllables? Check all that apply.
_English languages are composed of a set of stressed and unstressed syllables
_Some syllables seem to have a long or short sound when they are pronounced. We can call this different syllable emphasis stressed or unstressed.
_Not all spoken word has a rhythm formed by stressed and unstressed syllables.
Question 4:
Within poetry _____ is the pattern of stresses within a line of verse.
A. iamb
B. rhythm
C. Slant rhyme
D. rhyme
Question 5:
Meter in poetry is defined by
A.syllables
B. iambs
C. beat
D. metrical feet
Question 6:
The following are characteristics of iambic pentameter. Check all that apply
_created by metrical feet of one unstressed syllable and one stressed syllable.
_created by metrical feet of two unstressed syllables and one stressed syllable.
_the metrical foot is called an iamb.
_there are five iambs in a line.
Question 7:
The following are characteristics of trochaic tetrameter. Check all that apply
_there are eight feet to a line.
_created by metrical feet of one unstressed syllable and one stressed syllable.
_created by metrical feet of one stressed and one unstressed syllable.
_the metrical foot is called a imab.
Question 8:
Match the literary element with its definition
_patterns of end rhymes 1. Rhyme
_the repetition of syllables 2. End Rhyme
_the repetition of syllables at the end of a line. 3. Rhyme Scheme
Question 9:
Rhyme is important to poetry because
A. It is a defining characteristic of poetry.
B. It is a road sign to sense, to ambiguity, to new possible meanings
C. Once a poet creates a rhyme pattern, they must stick to it.
Question 10:
Read the following stanza:
Not warp’d by passion, awed by rumor;
Not grave through pride, nor gay through folly;
An equal mixture of good-humor
And sensible soft melancholy
This is an example of ________.
A. heroic couplet
B. masculine rhyme
C. feminine rhyme
Question 11:
Rhymes of close parallels of sounds, but not exact sounds are called
A. Slant rhymes
B. masculine rhymes
C. feminine rhymes
Question 12:
English is harder to rhyme, because it tends to emphasize the importance of the first syllable while deemphasizing the importance of the last syllable in words.
True
or
False
Question 13:
Why do poets use alliteration, the repetition of initial sounds?
A. to create a euphonous art, art that makes you, the reader, feel something.
B. to create a grammatical form.
C. to create beginning rhymes, rather than end rhymes.
Question 14:
Read the excerpt from Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Fish”
He hung a grunting weight,
Battered and venerable
and homely. Here and there
his brown skin hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper
The line, “his brown skin hung in strips” is an example of which poetic device?
A. assonance
B. consonance
C. alliteration
D. rhyme
Question 15:
Why did Shakespeare choose iambic pentameter for his plays?
A. It was a popular poetic meter in the time.
B. Iambic pentameter was a difficult poetic meter for English speakers, and his choice shows his mastery of the language.
C. His most poetic lines don’t just talk about the feelings of the heart, they follow the rhythm of the heart.

Which critiques of pastoral love poetry do you find most compelling and/or satisfying, or which alternate critiques would you want to make?

Last week, we discussed the forms and conventions of sixteenth-century English love poems and got a taste of how those conventions were transformed and transgressed by seventeenth-century poets. Today, we consider two other ways poets were responding to one another: through direct parody and through poetic critique.
Our first pair of poems are Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” and Sir Walter Raleigh’s parody “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd.” Both are sixteenth-century poems in the pastoral tradition, a literary trope that takes a countryside setting and centers on shepherds and shepherdesses as protagonists. Pastoral poems have classical origins in works like Virgil’s Eclogues and Georgics, and in the renaissance, they can also have a moralizing tone; since Jesus refers to himself as “the good shepherd” in the New Testament, early modern poets sometimes used shepherding metaphors to make a not-too-veiled statement about good versus bad priests and religious authorities. But we won’t be looking directly at those kinds of pastoral poems. It is worth noting that pastoral tropes were very popular in court poetry, drama, and prose romances in the sixteenth century, and the upper-class city dwellers and courtiers seemed to really enjoy the fantasy of the “simple life” proffered by poetic shepherd-lovers and beautiful country lasses. Notice how Raleigh’s parody of Marlowe’s poem offers a not-so-subtle critique of these conventions!
Our second pair of readings are Robert Southwell’s Epistle (a dedicatory letter) to a manuscript of his English poems that he sent to a relative. (The edition we have is from an early manuscript copy of the manuscript – not the original.) In his Epistle, Southwell speaks out against what he sees as the moral problems with the love poetry of his day, and he makes a case for why religious people not only can but *should* use poetry for devout ends. Our final reading, the seventeenth-century Protestant poet George Herbert’s poem “Jordan (I)” takes up Southwell’s argument in poetic form, making a more subtle critique of pastoral love poetry.
For this week’s discussion post, I would like you to read these texts and consider the relationships between them. Pay special attention to the rhetorical and poetic strategies many of these poets use to critique other poets. Then, please complete a discussion post in which you do the following:
1) In part 1 of your post, please use at least one quote from Marlowe’s poem and one quote from Raleigh’s poem to illustrate one or more ways Raleigh is critiquing or making fun of Marlowe’s poetic speaker. Try to be as specific as possible in explaining how Raleigh’s quote talks back to Marlowe’s poem. I encourage you to consider language and elements of form as well as imagery and ideas. (150-200 words)
2) In part 2 of your post, please use one quote from Southwell’s Epistle and one quote from Herbert’s “Jordan (I)” to explain how each one is talking back to/critiquing an element of pastoral poetry that we can see in Marlowe’s poem. (150-200 words)
3) In part 3 of your post, reflect on how these varied critiques of pastoral love poetry relate to your own impressions. Are there elements of pastoral love poetry that appeal to you or that you think appeal to a lot of people today? Which critiques of pastoral love poetry do you find most compelling and/or satisfying, or which alternate critiques would you want to make? (75-100 words)

You should write 1 page on how historically communities of color have experienced division and opposition that have negatively impacted these communities as a whole.

This activity is designed to help with linguistic cultural awareness and interrogate how other linguistically and racially diverse communities experience racial and linguistic violence and are impacted by linguistic racism. The reading attached is designed to give you another perspective on linguistic racism and how it affects different communities. You should write 1 page on how historically communities of color have experienced division and opposition that have negatively impacted these communities as a whole. Using the readings we’ve read, in addition to Anzaldua and your personal knowledge of the topic.