Answers to the discussion questions do not need to be long.

Read “How I Learned to Drive,” and answer the following Discussion questions and answer the 5 Quiz questions
attached in the files. Answers to the discussion questions do not need to be long. Just need to be answered.
1. Who is the protagonist?
2. Which characters are the protagonist’s opposing forces?
3. What is the climax?
4. What is the major dramatic question?
5. What is the introductory incident?
6. What is the moment of engagement?
7. Do the proposed introductory incident, moment of engagement, and climax support the major dramatic question?

Please write 1 page for each question above.

Short Answer questions- 1) How does Edward Albee’s Zoo Story qualify as theater of the absurd?
2) Why is Henrik Ibsen considered the father of Realism?
Please write 1 page for each question above.
essay questions: respond in 6 paragraphs, typed in MLA format along with in-text citations for quotations.
Compare and contrast some world or local events to some of the themes Zoo story attempted to explore., including the madness and illogic of society. Present a working definition of Absurdist theater.

What moment of the play formed the strongest impact on you?

Include 2 integrated quotes from our text—Theatre, The Lively Art by Wilson & Goldfarb
Basic Info: Playwright’s name and the Theatre in which you saw the Play – The Polk State College Black Box Theater, for example.
2. Summarize the plot of the story…Be very brief…no more than two or three sentences. You will be marked down if 80% of your paper is a synopsis. I want your analysis, thoughts, impressions, and feelings about your experience of the play in the theatre that night, and how it relates back to what you’ve been reading in the text and the power-points; not a play-by-play report of the plot.
3. Transition into the first topic.
What were the major ideas addressed in the play? “Ideas” is a plural word so please write about more than just one idea found in the Play. Do you think these ideas are important for our society to consider?
5. What moment(s) incited the major conflict(s)?
6. What moment(s) did the climax occur? Provide Details…
7. Transition into the second topic.
8. The actors–which performances did you find most convincing-believable? What aspects of these performances made them stand out?
9. Was there a performance that you found lacking? Why?
10. What aspect of the design did you find most successful?
Set design –
Costumes –
Lighting –
Sound – …describe specific elements for each.
11. Were there any technical aspects that missed the mark? Why?
12. Transition into the conclusion.
1. Was your overall opinion of the play favorable or not? Cite specific moments and reasons that support your thumbs up or down. What did specifically like or dislike about the story, the theatre space, the acting, etc?
2. What moment of the play formed the strongest impact on you?
3. How would you describe your overall Emotional response to the play? Were you touched, incensed, bored, and why? etc.
All based on a straight play (non musical)

However, as we know from the stage practices of product placement marketers, politicians, con-artists, propagandists, and good poker players, it is possible, and, depending on one’s ethics, oftentimes preferable to perform for an audience who is unaware of that a performance is taking place.

This open-book, take-home version of the midterm exam comprises a single three-part essay. The parts, taken together, will offer multiple perspectives on why the artistic performance activity we call “theater” comes into existence as a synthesis of both material and conceptual conditions. The essay should be 2-3 pages in length (no maximum length, so no need to limit your essay if you have more to say), and no formal style sheet, such as MLA, is required so long as all references to course material are cited in a consistent manner.
Keep in mind that while it’s important to give a reasonable response to the question, the very practical purpose of answering the question in the first place is to demonstrate in a straightforward way your grasp of what we’ve studied. This is to say that, even if you happen to have a difficult time answering this particular question, that’s okay. It’s still entirely possible to earn a high grade by demonstrating that you are familiar enough with what we’ve studied that you can enlist the help of some of the many relevant texts and concepts we studied in order to help you think through different aspects of the topic at hand. directly relate to the topic at hand. Demonstrate that you have a good enough grasp of course material that you know what texts and concepts are relevant here, and show how you can discuss them in order to help you think through a difficult question like this, and you can still do extremely well on the essay even if the conclusions you draw about this topic aren’t entirely on-point. In fact, even if you don’t struggle with this topic and even if you could write the essay off the top of your head without referencing course material, you should still reference and discuss as much relevant course material as you can, just because demonstrating your grasp of that material, more than answering this particular question, is the main point of the exam. I chose this topic because it really does touch on nearly everything we’ve studied, which makes it a good vehicle for you to show off your knowledge of a wide range of course material. So, just do your very best with the topic at hand, but if you can manage to demonstrate along the way that you have a good command of some of the many relevant texts and concepts we studied, it will be impossible to do poorly on this exam even if you happen to struggle with some aspect of this particular topic.
What To Write about in the Essay
Early in the semester we read an excerpt from Chaos, Territory, Art, Elizabeth Grosz’s philosophical discussion of the “ontology of art,” in other words, Grosz’s study of conditions under which something we call “art” comes to exist as such. In essence, Grosz discusses what it is that transforms mundane matter into something we uniquely experience as art. In other words, she addresses the conditions that are necessary for art to emerge as such. That is, what conditions must be present to transform, say, a lump of clay or some markings on paper into something we identify, seek out, experience, and value as art? Grosz suggests that the conditions necessary for the emergence of art fall under two key categories, the material and the conceptual, and that both aspects must be involved in artistic activity. Basically, if there were no conceptual aspect, the lump of clay would still be a lump of clay, and the markings on paper might be confused for something with a different purpose, like a doodle, design sketch or advertising image. Without the material aspect, there would be no physical object for us to perceive and experience as an object of art. Nor for that matter would there be an audience, because for Grosz the material conditions necessary for art to emerge include all the material aspects of the event. So, not only the marble of the statue or the body of the performer, but also the structure of the physical space and the biology of the spectator who perceives and experiences all of this.
Elizabeth Grosz’s text discusses how such material and conceptual conditions allow for the creation and experience of art, broadly speaking. Your essay will do something similar except it will discuss more narrowly how an interplay of conceptual and material conditions is necessary for the artistic performance activity of theater to emerge within everyday productive life.
The essay should be divided into three sections, the first discussing the material conditions, the second discussing the conceptual conditions, and the third discussing how both material and conceptual conditions must interact in order for theater to exist at its most basic level. The following descriptions of what kinds of things to consider under each section should be very helpful, along with the midterm exam concept review notes and the lecture notes within the units where the relevant texts were first introduced.
Part One – Material Conditions In the first part of the essay, you will address significant aspects of theater’s diverse material conditions, which include everything from the body of the performer, to the paint on the set, to light, to sound, to the neurobiology of the empathizing spectator.
Part Two – Conceptual Conditions In the second part of the essay, you will address significant aspects of theater’s “conceptual” conditions. These conceptual conditions include, for example, the performer’s conceptual knowledge that she is performing. She is consciously aware that her biological, physical movements are taking place within a context where different rules (concepts) of conduct apply, where disorder, absurdity, violence, transgression, shifting identity, and various other deviations from the normal will neither be punished nor marginalized in the way that they tend to be when they take place outside the aesthetic frame, in everyday productive life. However, as we know from the stage practices of product placement marketers, politicians, con-artists, propagandists, and good poker players, it is possible, and, depending on one’s ethics, oftentimes preferable to perform for an audience who is unaware of that a performance is taking place. And this is where it becomes clear that in order for theater to exist as art and not just a way to manipulate people, the conceptual conditions must include not only the performer’s awareness of performance, but crucially the spectator’s awareness of the performance as well.
Part Three – The Emergence of Theater as Such In the third part of the essay, you will draw from our course material some examples of how material and conceptual conditions converge within the theater. There are many, many ways to discuss this. You could discuss, for example, Wright’s concept of “empathy and aesthetic distance” (also discussed in the textbook), where empathy is seen as a material, physiological response to the perceived action, and aesthetic distance is the conceptual knowledge that one should not react in everyday ways (e.g., saving the dying man on the other side of the room) when observed events take place on the stage. Related to this, you could discuss Schechner’s idea of the way everything transforms within the bounds of performance. Social hierarchy, identity, to systems of value-everything changes just from the simple act of putting a conceptual border around some actions and saying that this is performance and the rules of everyday productive life are suspended for the moment. Obviously, Elizabeth Grosz’s discussion of the ontology of art would be useful here, so long as her broader discussion of art is put in the narrower terms of theater. Additionally, the various definitions of theater we
ld be useful here as well. Essentially, all course material is fair game. So all you need to do is pick three examples as a way to show how the “material conditions” you discussed in part one and the “conceptual

What are the central arguments made by the films and/or the texts and how do they relate to each other?

Write a 700 to 800-word response that critically reflects on this week’s film and at least one reading from the week. Relate the film and reading and connect them to the broader themes of the course. Your response should demonstrate your understanding of both the film and the reading. Do not simply summarize the film. You must use proper citations for all sources in your response. Below are some questions to serve as prompts for reflection. You do not have to address all of these questions in your response.
What are the central arguments made by the films and/or the texts and how do they relate to each other?
What social, cultural, political, or historical issues are brought into focus in the films and how?
What themes emerge from the films or texts and how do they relate to the broader themes of the class?
How do you personally connect to these themes or issues and how do the films and readings help you understand them in new ways?
Describe the film language in technical terms and discuss how it frames the film’s main themes.
Film: Le noire de/Black Girl (Ousmane Sembène, 1966, 55m) https://www.kanopy.com/en/product/10913163?vp=buffalo
Readings: “Fabulation: Toward a Minor Cinema,” D.N. Rodowick; “The Roots of the Nomadic: Gilles Deleuze and the Cinema of West Africa,” Dudley Andrew; Cineaste Interview with Ousmane Sembène
Notes/Lecture: Minor Cinema lecture, Nomadic Cinema lecture, Black Girl analysis

What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why?

What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why? What are the choices made in the performance or production in terms of acting, design, directing, and/or other elements that you find interesting or remarkable and why? How do these choices influence your understanding and interpretation of the play?
Describe and analyze concrete examples (visual or aural elements, acting, directing etc.) from the performance or production to support your answers. Provide descriptions of the examples that will help the reader see the physical world of the play created by the performance or production.
Avoid plot summary; instead, prioritize your own observations and analyses and use the plot developments as support or to contextualize the moments in the play that you describe.

What are the choices made in the performance or production in terms of acting, design, directing, and/or other elements that you find interesting or remarkable and why?

Based upon your viewing or attending experience, write a well-organized, well-written paper, with a clear thesis and development of ideas, supported by examples, in which you address the following: What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why? What are the choices made in the performance or production in terms of acting, design, directing, and/or other elements that you find interesting or remarkable and why? How do these choices influence your understanding and interpretation of the play?
Describe and analyze concrete examples (visual or aural elements, acting, directing etc.) from the performance or production to support your answers. Provide descriptions of the examples that will help the reader see the physical world of the play created by the performance or production.
Avoid plot summary; instead, prioritize your own observations and analyses and use the plot developments as support or to contextualize the moments in the play that you describe.

Describe the film language in technical terms and discuss how it frames the film’s main themes.

Write a 700 to 800-word response that critically reflects on this week’s film and at least one reading from the week. Relate the film and reading and connect them to the broader themes of the course. Your response should demonstrate your understanding of both the film and the reading. Do not simply summarize the film. You must use proper citations for all sources in your response. Below are some questions to serve as prompts for reflection. You do not have to address all of these questions in your response.
What are the central arguments made by the films and/or the texts and how do they relate to each other?
What social, cultural, political, or historical issues are brought into focus in the films and how?
What themes emerge from the films or texts and how do they relate to the broader themes of the class?
How do you personally connect to these themes or issues and how do the films and readings help you understand them in new ways?
Describe the film language in technical terms and discuss how it frames the film’s main themes.
Film: Le noire de/Black Girl (Ousmane Sembène, 1966, 55m) https://www.kanopy.com/en/product/10913163?vp=buffalo
Readings: “Fabulation: Toward a Minor Cinema,” D.N. Rodowick; “The Roots of the Nomadic: Gilles Deleuze and the Cinema of West Africa,” Dudley Andrew; Cineaste Interview with Ousmane Sembène
Notes/Lecture: Minor Cinema lecture, Nomadic Cinema lecture, Black Girl analysis

What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why?

What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why? What are the choices made in the performance or production in terms of acting, design, directing, and/or other elements that you find interesting or remarkable and why? How do these choices influence your understanding and interpretation of the play?
Describe and analyze concrete examples (visual or aural elements, acting, directing etc.) from the performance or production to support your answers. Provide descriptions of the examples that will help the reader see the physical world of the play created by the performance or production.
Avoid plot summary; instead, prioritize your own observations and analyses and use the plot developments as support or to contextualize the moments in the play that you describe.

Provide descriptions of the examples that will help the reader see the physical world of the play created by the performance or production.

Based upon your viewing or attending experience, write a well-organized, well-written paper, with a clear thesis and development of ideas, supported by examples, in which you address the following: What is interesting or remarkable about the performance or production in its creation of a physical world of the play in front of you and why? What are the choices made in the performance or production in terms of acting, design, directing, and/or other elements that you find interesting or remarkable and why? How do these choices influence your understanding and interpretation of the play?
Describe and analyze concrete examples (visual or aural elements, acting, directing etc.) from the performance or production to support your answers. Provide descriptions of the examples that will help the reader see the physical world of the play created by the performance or production.
Avoid plot summary; instead, prioritize your own observations and analyses and use the plot developments as support or to contextualize the moments in the play that you describe.