Hi, here is an easy intro for myself, so you can write the essay based on my info.

hi, here is an easy intro for myself, so you can write the essay based on my info. Btw I am a Chinese, so try to write based on Chinese culture. ALSO, please remind the writer i am a Chinese international student studying in Canada.
my major is in Operating management 4th year in Canada, I lived in a school dormitory for the first year of my university. and I have been renting an apartment since then. I am passive in dealing with different cultures, and I do not have many foreign friends, mainly Chinese friends. i am more collectivist, long term oriented, high power distance. i am in 4th stage of DMIS model.
if there is not enough info, you can make up some about the missing info.
So, for the midpoint essay, it’s 5 pages with a minimum of 5 sources. the final essay, it’s 7 pages with a minimum of 7 sources. plz try to write the final essay related to my major. also please give me 2 separated word documents at the end.
please follow the instructions and the apa format carefully, please run the Grammarly and plagiarism check before give back to me, thanks.
If you have any questions, let me know.

I have a couple of very good black friends, a few other culture friends.

hi, here is an easy intro for myself, so you can write the essay based on my info. Btw I am Chinese, so try to write based on Chinese culture. ALSO, please remind the writer i am a Chinese international student studying in Canada.
my majoring is in economics, studying in Canada already for 7 years. I used to rent and live with roommates but now i have my own house. i am ok with different cultures. And, i am willing to take the initiative to contact different cultures. i have a couple of very good black friends, a few other culture friends. we usually go out to eat, watch movies and chat with them. i am more individualistic and have a clear plan for my future. I am in stage 4 of DMIS model, in which I accept all different cultures.
if there is not enough info, you can make up some of the missing info.
So, for the midpoint essay, it’s 5 pages with a minimum of 5 sources. the final essay, it’s 8 pages with a minimum of 7 sources. plz try to write the final essay related to my major. also please give me 2 separated word documents at the end.
please follow the instructions and the APA format carefully, please run the Grammarly and plagiarism check before give back to me, thanks.
If you have any questions, let me know.

The final essay, it’s 8 pages with a minimum of 7 sources.

hi, here is an easy intro for myself, so you can write the essay based on my info. Btw I am a Chinese, so try to write based on Chinese culture. ALSO, please remind the writer i am a Chinese international student studying in Canada.
My major is economics and I have been studying in Canada for 3 years as a university student. I am an international student from China. I lived in the school dormitory during my freshman year, and i have been renting with my friends since then. Most of the time I am actively involved in different cultural activities, not have many foreign friends, usually playing games with foreign friends or playing sports with them at school. I’m a collectivist and will occasionally plan for the long term. I should be in stage 4 in DMIS model.
if there is not enough info, you can make up some about the missing info.
So, for the midpoint essay, it’s 5 pages with a minimum of 5 sources. the final essay, it’s 8 pages with a minimum of 7 sources. plz try to write the final essay related to my major. also please give me 2 separated word documents at the end.
please follow the instructions and the APA format carefully, please run the Grammarly and plagiarism check before give back to me, thanks.
If you have any questions, let me know.

Your script should have the following elements:

Diversity challenges human service professionals to do good work with all clients by embracing cultural competence and cross-cultural sensitivity . Unfortunately, such skills are often lacking, with the result being that clients from diverse cultures are frequently misunderstood, often misdiagnosed, sometimes spoken down to and other times patronized, have the impact of negative social forces minimized, find the helping relationship less helpful, seek mental health services at lower rates, and terminate helping relationships earlier.” (Evans, Delphin, Simmons, Omar, & Tebes, 2005; Neukrug & Milliken, 2008; Sewell, 2009; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001).
Cultural competence and cultural sensitivity needs to be practiced. Create a brief script that demonstrates a dialogue between you (human services worker) and a client system, co-worker, supervisor, or community partner. In the script, the human services worker should make an earnest attempt at being more culturally competent or culturally sensitive.
Your script should have the following elements:
Worker Role – Name the position of the human services worker
Presenting Issue – Briefly explain the interaction between you and the client system, co-worker, supervisor, or community partner.
Scene Description – Describe the place where the worker and subject are meeting
Dialogue – Create a brief exchange and demonstrate cultural competency
ie)
Worker:
Client:
Worker:
Client:
Worker:
Client:

How does islam adapt to norwegian society and what challenges does it face?

Research question.
How does Islam adapt to Norwegian society and what challenges does it face?
Maybe you should also interview a Norwegian professor of religion, or somebody knowledgeable, about the same. (make it up)
this is like ethnographic.
Disposition of the task
When the research work is completed, primary (own empirical research) and secondary data
(literature studies) have been obtained, the time has come to write the thesis. Write in such a way that you
“recapitulate” the time progression. You now have a retrospective look at something in the past, but imagine that you have to guide a reader through a research process. The reader should be drawn into the material and “experience” being “present” yourself. Therefore, generally use the present tense, what is often referred to as
“ethnographic present”, (but not consistently, occasionally it may be natural to use others’
verbal forms. Fluency in a language is of course also important.
Main Section
Arranged in individual parts, where the new builds on what is to come. Feel free to use intermediate titles.
a) Detailed explanation of the topic. Obtain the necessary background material, possibly a presentation
of the research site and research population.
b) Theory. What has been written about the topic before that is of interest to this assignment? A card presentation of secondary sources will present your theoretical point of view or perspective.
c) Explanation of the method you use, which you may have “tailored” in relation to your problem.
d) Reflexivity and research ethics. Here you are transparent about your role as a researcher in relation to
preconception and subjectivity and how you will try to deal with its impact.
Attention to possible research effects and any other limitations is also
relevant to look at her. The ethical issue of how you represent your informants is important. Give an account of privacy, anonymization, possible use of pseudonyms, etc.
e) Presentation of relevant material from your investigation that you collected through literature study and your own work. The cooperation of data according to what is an applicable
progression towards presenting an argument. Direct, indirect quotation as it will fall naturally in the presentation of your narrative.
This creates the basis for later giving a credible answer to the research question or issue.
f) Discussion of the material in light of the issue. Discusses and analyzes what one has found; I am informed by the main theoretical perspective and other secondary sources that are relevant. Against
In the end, it is natural to come to a conclusion on the discussion, which is to answer the problem.
e) conclusion
references or sources.

If you have any questions tell me asap

Please this is an important assignment because it worth a big chunk of the final grade. Follow the instructions in the rubric and check that you have satisfied all the points please. I attached the book and a proposal I already submitted. If you have any questions tell me asap
Comments from Customer
Discipline: African American Studies

However, the children of us citizens could still enter america.

Download the book PDF from this website: https://vdoc.pub/download/strangers-from-a-different-shore-a-history-of-asian-americans-18emd66nl6oo
4 Required Question Sets
In the first textbook Strangers From A Different Shore read about the first Chinese Americans and submit the answers to 4 reading question sets by Sunday 11pm
Question Sets 1-4:
Chapter 6: Ethnic Islands The Emergence of Urban Chinese America 230-269)
Answer 4 questions sets from the lists below using your own original words. For full credit, write your own original answers in complete sentences and paragraphs. For partial credit, if you copy 5 or more words in a row that are not your own, you must quote the words you copied and give the source, including page number. Include the question number, the questions, or give the page numbers for the question sets you have chosen. A question set is all the questions grouped together.
Question Set 1: Economic Conditions Immigrant Generation
Choose and answer one question set about economic conditions for the immigrant generation:
pages 239-240 How did jobs change for the immigrant Chinese Americans, comparing work in 2 different centuries? How are jobs in the 19th century different from work inside the cities in the early 20th century ?
page 241 Where did Chinese get the money needed to start a laundry? p.242 What was hard about laundry work?
page 244 Did most laundrymen make it back to live in China? In an effort to get rich, what did some turn to?
pages 244-245 What acts of resistance did laundrymen engage in?
Question Set 2: Economic Conditions American Born Chinese
ECONOMIC CONDITIONS INCLUDE JOBS, WORK LIFE, HOW PEOPLE EARN MONEY, BUSINESSES, SOMETIMES AN ETHNIC ECONOMY.
Choose and answer one question set about economic conditions for the American born generation:
Tourism started very early in Chinatown. After the 1906 earthquake, San Francisco Chinatown is rebuilt to encourage tourists. During the Great Depression in the 1930’s, tourist money was supposed to provide jobs and help the community. page 249 – What were tourists shown and told about Chinatown, strengthening stereotypes about Chinese? How did some Chinese American children react to these tourist invasions?
pages 261-265 Jade Snow Wong was unique in pursuing a college education and business of her own. Why wouldn’t her family pay for Jade Snow Wong’s college education? What did Jade Snow Wong do to afford a college education? How did her race and gender limit Jade Snow Wong’s job options?
pages 265-267 In the years before WW2 what challenges did college educated Chinese face after they graduated? Where did they think about going to find jobs that would fit their college degrees?
Question Set 3: Political Conditions
POLITICAL CONDITIONS include laws, government policies, court decisions, and political opinions. Anti-Chinese laws are passed on the national level, not just the local and state levels.
Factors like racism, prejudice and stereotypes can fall under either Political Conditions or Social Conditions.
Choose and answer one question set about Political Conditions in Chapter 6:
pages 230-231 Why did the US government make it so difficult for Chinese families to reunite in America? How is this similar to anti-Asian sentiments today?
page 234- How did some families resist unfair policies and manage to reunite in the US after the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire?
page 235 The 1924 Immigration Act cut off the flow of all merchants, their wives and children into the US. However, the children of US citizens could still enter America. Why?
pages 237-238 Why was life on Angel Island hard? How could you get released from Angel Island?
Question Set 4: Social Conditions
SOCIAL CONDITIONS include community life, religion, cultural traditions, customs, language, celebrations, identity, housing, food, leisure activities, community groups. Family, or the lack of family, gender roles and generational issues can also be examined under social conditions.
Choose and answer one question set about Social Conditions in Chapter 6:
page 246 Why did Chinese live in Chinatown? What was hard about housing conditions there?
page 253 In terms of social conditions, what did Chinatown provide for the people living there? What could they find in Chinatown?
page 255 What was life like for the children living in Chinatown? p. 257 After public school, where did the children go?
page 259 What did immigrants call second generation Chinese Americans? What difficulties did young Chinese American women encounter?

What factors shape your own diverse experiences?

Module Overview
In the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 2 states:
Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.
At its core, this declaration recognizes the variety of humans that inhabit this planet and challenges any government, organization, group, or entity that seeks to undermine or threaten this diversity. The declaration includes the categories it does partly because people have been marginalized throughout the world based on many of those categories. The United Nations presents this article of inclusion because history has proven that diversity—especially when it takes the form of open cultures where human rights flourish—contributes to the furthering of cultural growth within the human family.
A discussion about diversity should acknowledge three factors: culture, identity, and power. In this class, we will navigate these factors from many perspectives, including your own. Centuries ago, social changes inspired humanist and Enlightenment philosophers to explore a wide range of new discussions relating culture, identity, and power to progressive ideas of inclusion. This exploration has evolved rapidly in the last 60 years. Since the beginning of this millennium, social changes have inspired a wide range of new discussions and opportunities to reimagine our place within the human community. The goal of this class is to provide an opportunity for you to come together with other students and examine what the topic of diversity means in the current moment. You will apply critical thinking and analysis skills to engage in constructive, inclusive, and insightful conversations about the role of diversity in our collective future.
As you work through this module’s content and the course as a whole, consider the following:
What factors shape your own diverse experiences?
How do these factors inform how you see the world?
What factors of diversity are absent from your day-to-day life?
How might knowing about these factors of diversity change your perspective?
In this module, you will explore four general education interdisciplinary lenses to inform your study of diversity: humanities, history, natural and applied sciences, and social science. They represent the perspectives of these different academic disciplines. As you go further in this course, you will see how each field of study approaches diversity and frames the critical analysis tools of bias, agency, methodology, and intention. By the end of this course, you will better understand diversity; its effect on various social, economic, and political institutions; and its major influence on the future of society.
Beliefs, Assumptions, and Values
Beliefs are convictions that people feel certain are true. For example, you may have a belief in a higher power, your own abilities, or a political party. Beliefs help us to quickly process, categorize, and evaluate information. The formation of our belief system is influenced by our culture, family, personal experiences, and education. Our beliefs inform the assumptions we make about the world.
Since beliefs are shortcuts our brain uses, they sometimes lead us to jump to conclusions or make assumptions. Assumptions are ideas that people accept as true without proof. Whether right or wrong, assumptions are not always based on valid information and are formed primarily from previous experiences and our belief system. Examples of assumptions include someone who is not good with numbers assuming they cannot pass a math class, or fans assuming that when a professional athletic team spends millions on new players, it will make the team better.
Our values influence our beliefs and assumptions. Values are the principles or standards that a culture considers important (for example, freedom, loyalty, fairness, responsibility, and independence). Values influence people’s traits, routines, rituals, and behaviors. Your personal values are stable, long-lasting principles that reflect what is most important to you and how you make choices in your life. For example, hard work and dedication lead to success; or, if you want a task done right, do it yourself. Values reflect who we are as individuals, what is most important to us, what we take pride in, and how we conduct ourselves.
How do beliefs, assumptions, and values relate to diversity? The world’s populations have grown exponentially since the end of World War II. Although we have always been a global community, populations, global trade, and fast-paced travel have grown and developed significantly. In addition, large-scale diasporas have made it impossible to ignore the complex and varied spectrum of human diversity. Diasporas are populations of people who have left their home countries and moved to other locations while maintaining their original cultural practices. Because of these factors, we can no longer ignore the fact that not everyone around us will share our beliefs, assumptions, and values. The skills you will be working on in this class provide you with tools for engaging with the larger world around you. Critical analysis lets you see, hear, and learn about another person with clarity and empathy.
As you begin to wrestle with the ever-shifting topic of diversity, you will notice that much of what is described in your readings exists within systems of beliefs, assumptions, and values. Research is often motivated by personal curiosity. This curiosity influences every aspect of what scholars write about. The research questions that get answered depend on who forms the question and the beliefs, assumptions, and values of entities that approve and fund the research. Thus, personal beliefs, assumptions, and values can have a significant impact on how research is conducted, and ultimately what we as humans claim to know.
Discussing Diversity
Talking about diversity can be very intense. The topic includes a wide range of experiences that bring out big emotions in all sorts of people. Regardless of age and education, all humans learn better when they feel safe. The best way to create safety in our class discussions is to acknowledge our collective humanity and our potential vulnerability. Because we can’t know how others want to be treated, we engage with thoughtfulness and assume best intentions in others to understand what others mean.
A technique from peaceful conflict resolution is particularly helpful here: In conversations with others, instead of using “you” statements, we aim for “I” statements. A “you” statement is one that assumes the intent of the other person, such as, “you said a thing I don’t like ….” In contrast, “I” statements frame our experience, such as, “I find this idea difficult because ….” Turning conversation to your own thoughts and experiences and leaving space for others to bring their experiences is a way to open potentially divisive conversations into opportunities for learning together.
The goal of our classroom discussions is to process our individual critical thinking about the topics within the class. To this end, prioritizing respectful dialogue, listening, and learning together deepens the effect of each discussion. While speaking about diversity in a diverse community, notice what informs your opinions. Remember that all the posts in our discussion threads represent people who have real human experiences and emotions. Appreciating your classmate’s ideas and experiences even when you don’t agree supports a safe environment for learning. It is also important to notice that even ideas of what constitutes “respect” have cultural specificity that may be different for different students. If someone in a discussion shares an opinion that feels offensive, remember that the first goal is to learn from each other’s differences. If you are unsure, ask questions of each other. If it feels comfortable, share a personal experience that influences your personal opinion.
Looking Ahead
This class gives you the opportunity to explore a topic related to diversity and contextualize the importance of diversity within your personal experiences, field of study or profession, and society. As one of the culminating experiences of the General Education program at Southern New Hampshire University, this class will also enhance critical thinking skills, communication skills, and cultural awareness.
To practice these skills, you will examine a specific topic using researched evidence. The topic you choose will be a single issue, event, or situation related to diversity. You will focus on how the topic impacts a significant population by leveraging one of four general education interdisciplinary lenses. When choosing a topic, you may find it helpful to consider your personal or professional experience. For example, if your major is human resources, an issue you might consider is pay equality in the workplace. If you are a nursing major, perhaps you want to explore access to healthcare in impoverished communities. Maybe you are a gamer and would be interested in exploring the representation of women and men in video games. Whatever you choose, you will need to obtain instructor approval of your topic. You will also be able to modify your topic until Module Two.
Please be sure to review the Project Guidelines and Rubric in the Assignment Information area. Your project is due in Module Seven. All the assignments you complete in this course relate directly to the work you will do on your project. Be sure to review and use the feedback on assignments given along the way by your instructor to strengthen the final submission of your project.
References
United Nations. (n.d.). Universal declaration of human rights. https://www.un.org/en/about-us/universal-declaration-of-human-rights