Tight connections between concept and example.

Evaluation criteria:

A succinct, clear, opening position sentence.
Engagement with the specific content of the readings, through carefully chosen, brief quotes from the text, or a clear use of the text’s central concepts in its own words.
Concentrate on the most essential points of the text and their broader implications.
An example that illuminates the concept’s utility, which cannot be taken from lectures.
Tight connections between concept and example.
Use precise language that analyses the specific qualities of your example, whether an actual garment, a representation of it, or a wearing of it.
Correct spelling, grammar, and word choice.
Logical and cumulative order of points (avoid rambling and repetition.)
Use no more than 2 quotations and keep quotations at a maximum of 100 words.
Include all citations as footnotes following the Chicago Manual of Style.
A conclusion that does more than repeat any other part of the paper.

Discuss how early christian art develop out of the roam style into what will be byzantine style art.

Discuss How early Christian art develop out of the Roam style into what will be Byzantine style art. Be sure to include information concerning the history behind the fall of the Western Empire and the rise of the Eastern Byzantine Empire. Be sure to discuss the architecture just as much as the objects. Use these examples: (Please Cite)
Christ as the Good Shepard statue
Janius Bassus Sarcophagus
Ivory Relief of the Judas and the Crucifixion
Gall Placidia Mausoleum and the Good Shepard mosaic
Sant’ Apollinare church and the Miracle of Loaves and Fishes mosaic
Hagia Sophia church
San Vitale and its Justinian and Theodora mosaics

How do the shadows affect the work?

Bamboo and rocks
Artist: Li Kan (Chinese, 1245–1320)
Period: Yuan dynasty (1271–1368)
Date: dated 1318
Culture: China
Gallery 210
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/40456
What is a formal analysis?
A formal analysis is an analysis of the forms appearing in a work of art. These forms give the work its expression, message, or meaning. A formal analysis assumes a work of art is (1) a constructed object (2) that has been created with a stable meaning (even though it might not be clear to the viewer) (3) that can be ascertained by studying the relationships between the elements of the work. The formal analysis is more than just a descriiption of the work. It should also include a thesis statement that reflects your conclusions about the work. The thesis statement may, in general, answer a question like these: What do I think is the meaning of this work? What is the message that this work or artist sends to the viewer? What does this work accomplish and how? What’s the point of it and how do the visual elements of the work support that point? The thesis statement is an important element. It sets the tone for the entire paper, and sets it apart from being a merely descriiptive paper.
Format for the Paper: 3 pages; double spaced; Times New Roman; 1” margins; last name and page numbers on bottom footer. Make sure you proofread your papers for adhering to the information listed above, as well as incorrect grammar, spelling, punctuation, and other errors. In addition, make sure your paper includes a thesis statement. Your grade will reflect your ability to follow these guidelines.
In the first paragraph, called the introduction, you will include:
the subject being analyzed
a very brief descriiption of the work
thesis statement – usually the last line or so of your first paragraph.
From that point, the rest of the formal analysis should include not only a descriiption of the piece, but especially those details of the work that have led you to come to your thesis. Yet, your paper should not be a random flow of ideas about the work (i.e. stream of consciousness writing). Rather, your paper should have a sense of order, moving purposefully through your descriiption with regard to specific elements (ex: one paragraph may deal with composition, another with a descriiption of figures, another on the background, another about line, etc., depending on the artwork). Finally, in your conclusion (the final paragraph) you should end your paper with an elevated restatement of your thesis.
It is important to remember that your interest here is strictly formal; NO RESEARCH IS TO BE USED IN THIS PAPER. In other words, you are strictly relying on your ability to visually ‘read’ a work of art and make interpretations about it based on your analysis of it. Remember too that your analysis should not be just a mechanical, physical descriiption, though you should use descriiptive language and adjectives to situate your work in your larger argument. Begin generally, and then move on to the more specific elements of the work.
Things to consider when writing a formal analysis (in no particular order):
Keep in mind that you always need to back up your statements with visual evidence!
– Record your first impression(s) of the artwork. What stands out? Is there a focal point (an area to which the artist wants your eye to be drawn)? If so, what formal elements led you to this conclusion? Your impressions can help you reach your thesis.
– What is the subject of the artwork?
– Composition: How are the parts of the work arranged? Is there a stable or unstable composition? Is it dynamic? Full of movement? Or is it static?
– Pose: If the work has figures, are the proportions believable? Realistic? Describe the pose(s). Is the figure active, calm, graceful, stiff, tense, or relaxed? Does the figure convey a mood? If there are several figures, how do they relate to each other (do they interact? not?)?
– Proportions: Does the whole or even individual parts of the figure(s) or natural objects in the work look natural? Why did you come to this conclusion?
– Line: Are the outlines (whether perceived or actual) smooth, fuzzy, clear? Are the main lines vertical, horizontal, diagonal, or curved, or a combination of any of these? Are the lines jagged and full of energy? Sketchy? Geometric? Curvilinear? Bold? Subtle?
– Space: If the artist conveys space, what type of space is used? What is the relation of the main figure to the space around it? Are the main figures entirely within the space (if the artwork is a painting), or are parts of the bodies cut off by the edge of the artwork? Is the setting illusionistic, as if one could enter the space of the painting, or is it flat and two-dimensional, a space that one could not possibly enter?
– Texture: If a sculpture, is the surface smooth and polished or rough? Are there several textures conveyed? Where and How? If a painting, is there any texture to the paint surface? Are the brushstrokes invisible? Brushy? Sketchy? Loose and flowing? Or tight and controlled?
– Light and Shadow: Are shadows visible? Where? Are there dark shadows, light shadows, or both? How do the shadows affect the work?
– Size: How big is the artwork? Are the figures or objects in the work life-sized, larger or smaller than life? How does the size affect the work?
– Color: What type of colors are used in the work? Bright? Dull? Complimentary? Does the artist use colors to draw your attention to specific areas of the work? How? If a sculpture, examine the color(s) of the medium and how it affects the work.
– Mood: Do you sense an overall mood in the artwork? Perhaps several different moods? If so, describe them. How does the mood interpret how you view the work?

Is it dynamic?

Bamboo and rocks
Artist: Li Kan (Chinese, 1245–1320)
Period: Yuan dynasty (1271–1368)
Date: dated 1318
Culture: China
Gallery 210
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/40456
What is a formal analysis?
A formal analysis is an analysis of the forms appearing in a work of art. These forms give the work its expression, message, or meaning. A formal analysis assumes a work of art is (1) a constructed object (2) that has been created with a stable meaning (even though it might not be clear to the viewer) (3) that can be ascertained by studying the relationships between the elements of the work. The formal analysis is more than just a descriiption of the work. It should also include a thesis statement that reflects your conclusions about the work. The thesis statement may, in general, answer a question like these: What do I think is the meaning of this work? What is the message that this work or artist sends to the viewer? What does this work accomplish and how? What’s the point of it and how do the visual elements of the work support that point? The thesis statement is an important element. It sets the tone for the entire paper, and sets it apart from being a merely descriiptive paper.
Format for the Paper: 3 pages; double spaced; Times New Roman; 1” margins; last name and page numbers on bottom footer. Make sure you proofread your papers for adhering to the information listed above, as well as incorrect grammar, spelling, punctuation, and other errors. In addition, make sure your paper includes a thesis statement. Your grade will reflect your ability to follow these guidelines.
In the first paragraph, called the introduction, you will include:
the subject being analyzed
a very brief descriiption of the work
thesis statement – usually the last line or so of your first paragraph.
From that point, the rest of the formal analysis should include not only a descriiption of the piece, but especially those details of the work that have led you to come to your thesis. Yet, your paper should not be a random flow of ideas about the work (i.e. stream of consciousness writing). Rather, your paper should have a sense of order, moving purposefully through your descriiption with regard to specific elements (ex: one paragraph may deal with composition, another with a descriiption of figures, another on the background, another about line, etc., depending on the artwork). Finally, in your conclusion (the final paragraph) you should end your paper with an elevated restatement of your thesis.
It is important to remember that your interest here is strictly formal; NO RESEARCH IS TO BE USED IN THIS PAPER. In other words, you are strictly relying on your ability to visually ‘read’ a work of art and make interpretations about it based on your analysis of it. Remember too that your analysis should not be just a mechanical, physical descriiption, though you should use descriiptive language and adjectives to situate your work in your larger argument. Begin generally, and then move on to the more specific elements of the work.
Things to consider when writing a formal analysis (in no particular order):
Keep in mind that you always need to back up your statements with visual evidence!
– Record your first impression(s) of the artwork. What stands out? Is there a focal point (an area to which the artist wants your eye to be drawn)? If so, what formal elements led you to this conclusion? Your impressions can help you reach your thesis.
– What is the subject of the artwork?
– Composition: How are the parts of the work arranged? Is there a stable or unstable composition? Is it dynamic? Full of movement? Or is it static?
– Pose: If the work has figures, are the proportions believable? Realistic? Describe the pose(s). Is the figure active, calm, graceful, stiff, tense, or relaxed? Does the figure convey a mood? If there are several figures, how do they relate to each other (do they interact? not?)?
– Proportions: Does the whole or even individual parts of the figure(s) or natural objects in the work look natural? Why did you come to this conclusion?
– Line: Are the outlines (whether perceived or actual) smooth, fuzzy, clear? Are the main lines vertical, horizontal, diagonal, or curved, or a combination of any of these? Are the lines jagged and full of energy? Sketchy? Geometric? Curvilinear? Bold? Subtle?
– Space: If the artist conveys space, what type of space is used? What is the relation of the main figure to the space around it? Are the main figures entirely within the space (if the artwork is a painting), or are parts of the bodies cut off by the edge of the artwork? Is the setting illusionistic, as if one could enter the space of the painting, or is it flat and two-dimensional, a space that one could not possibly enter?
– Texture: If a sculpture, is the surface smooth and polished or rough? Are there several textures conveyed? Where and How? If a painting, is there any texture to the paint surface? Are the brushstrokes invisible? Brushy? Sketchy? Loose and flowing? Or tight and controlled?
– Light and Shadow: Are shadows visible? Where? Are there dark shadows, light shadows, or both? How do the shadows affect the work?
– Size: How big is the artwork? Are the figures or objects in the work life-sized, larger or smaller than life? How does the size affect the work?
– Color: What type of colors are used in the work? Bright? Dull? Complimentary? Does the artist use colors to draw your attention to specific areas of the work? How? If a sculpture, examine the color(s) of the medium and how it affects the work.
– Mood: Do you sense an overall mood in the artwork? Perhaps several different moods? If so, describe them. How does the mood interpret how you view the work?

What’s the connection between the artist and the object?

Choose at least 3 images to discuss for the week, and in one to two sentences, explain why you chose these images. Was it a personal connection? Did you like something in particular? Or Did you just simply choose them because you felt like it?
For your three chosen images, provide a visual analysis (2-5 sentences). Describe what you see. Think about shape, material, color, pigment (if it has any), and texture. Is it an object? A sculpture? A painting. Observe the image, and simply just describe what you see.
Then list 3-5 facts about the image. Situate it in its historical context and tell me something we won’t know just by looking at it. Consider questions like who made it? Why was it made? What does it represent? What was its function? What’s the connection between the artist and the object?

Images
Buddhism
• Seated Buddha https://smarthistory.org/seated-buddha/
• The Stupa https://smarthistory.org/the-stupa/
• Four Buddhas https://smarthistory.org/four-buddhas-at-the-american-museum-of-natural-history/

How could they be better?

The first 3 essays assigned address the adaptation of traditional western museum models to distinct cultural contexts. In different ways, these three essays highlight the limitations of the western museum model.
Gabriela Germana and Amy Bowman-McElhone, “Asserting the Vernacular: Contested Musealities and Contemporary art in Lima, Peru,” 2020
Bogumil Jewsiewicki, “Museums for the People? Two Joint Projects for Haiti and the Congo,” 2007. (note: for Jewsiewicki’s essay, you don’t need to read the section about Haiti, instead, we’ll focus on pages 94-103 and the Conclusion, pages 106-107)
Winnie Wong, “Arresting Development: Winnie Wong on China’s museum boom,” 2015
The last essay, by Yesomi Umolu, highlights the limitations that traditional museum models have in serving the communities they claim to exist for. Umolu’s essay looks at the ways that museums have failed in the US, but her critique can apply to museums everywhere.
4. Yesomi Umolu, “On the Limits of Care and Knowledge,” 2020
1. For each of the first three essays, describe the key limitations of the western museum model addressed by the authors.
-Germana and Bowman-McElhone / Lima, Peru
-Jewsiewicki / Lubumbashi, Congo
-Wong / China
2. After reading Umolu’s essay, “On the Limits of Care and Knowledge,” reflect on your own experience at museums. In your experience, do museums feel like they are for you? How could they be better?

Country: norway

Based on your prior country selection, conduct some preliminary research on the visual art of your country through your preferred search engine.
Locate five images depicting examples of different kinds of visual art from your country. These examples can include paintings, sculpture, and architecture and should reflect historical, traditional art as well as modern-day artwork.
Include all five images with a caption in a document. Each caption should include 50-100 words describing what the art piece is, who created it, the year it was created, and why it is valued in your country.
Country: Norway

Why did you select this particular art piece among all other options?

We analyzed the visual art of countries around the world for a deeper understanding of the relationship between art and culture.
We will choose one piece of art from our home country. Consider the region where you grew up or, if you traveled frequently, the region where you spent a large portion of your childhood. First, describe that place in approximately 100 words, identifying the region by city, state, and country as applicable.
Next, research and choose one work of visual art that defines that part of the world. Include the image of your chosen work of art in your document along with a caption that includes the name of the piece of art, when it was created, and who created it.
Finally, describe in 250 words why this particular art piece appeals to your cultural and personal tastes. Why did you select this particular art piece among all other options? How does this work of art connect to and represent the region where you grew up?
You will submit your assignment of approximately 350-400 words with your selected image embedded in the document itself.
Country: Switzerland

Choose one of the topics below.

Choose one of the topics below.
1. Inside the Pantheon-
Much of the ornament inside the Pantheon would be at home in a Greek building. Other features could not be done without concrete. Point out one of each.
2. the Colosseum-
The Colosseum uses Greek ornaments on the surface of the concrete structure. Just point out one specific Greek element, and one feature of the building that had to be done in concrete.
ALL INFO IS IN ATTATCHED FILES