This practice exam will focus on political parties, nominations, elections, campaigns, and interest groups.

I am needing help for a practice exam focusing on American National government. NOTE: This is NOT an easy (practice) exam. You should be well versed in American Government as this practice exam is a part of an “upper division” course. This practice exam will focus on political parties, nominations, elections, campaigns, and interest groups. The practice exam has 30 questions and you will have 75 minutes to complete and this must be done in one sitting (meaning you can’t start the practice exam and come back and finish at a later time).
A few things to note:
– In order to accept this role, you must be willing to download Respondus Lockdown Browser. It takes 1-2 minutes to download, it’s free, and you can delete after.
– Upon accepting, I will give you credentials that will give you access to do this task.
– If this task is done exceptionally well, then I will have more to offer in the coming days!
– Attached are the study materials that will help.
Thank you for your help!

Summarize the argument of the book in the first two paragraphs.

Summarize the argument of the book in the first two paragraphs. After the first two paragraphs, your response paper should be a mixture of analysis and summary. Use your response to raise questions; explore theoretical and methodological issues; connect the week’s reading to reading done in earlier weeks; identify critical gaps (as well as accomplishments) in the readings. Make sure you are using quotes and including the page numbers.

Explain, using two major concepts from class.(0-2 points)

You are to read and review the Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Employment Division v. Smith (1990). This case is listed below for your convenience.
After reading the case, you will need to write a 250-word essay on the case– be sure to use your own words, and don’t simply copy what’s in the case. This essay must answer each of the following questions, with points awarded as indicated:
What is the case about (summarized in your own words)? (0-1 points)
What is Employment Division’s argument? (0-1 points)
What is Smith’s argument? (0-1 points)
What does the Court decide, and why? What was the vote? Who wrote a dissenting opinion? (0-1 points)
In your opinion, was justice served or not? Explain, using two major concepts from class.(0-2 points)
If there were 80 million members of the Native American religion discussed in this case, why would the Supreme Court make the same ruling (0-2 points)?
If there were 80 million members of the Native American religion discussed in the case, why would the Supreme Court make a different ruling (0-2 points)?
Points will be awarded for this activity as follows:
The essay is at least 250 words long (no points will be awarded for this activity if the essay is shorter);
Your essay answers the questions thoroughly, and provides the required information (Points listed above).
The essay concludes with a list of references and uses paragraphs (no points will be awarded if this condition is not met)
To submit to Dropbox, prepare your submission as a PDF (preferred) or Word document and save it to your computer. Then click the link below to upload it through Dropbox.
Here is the Supreme Court Case you are to analyze:
Employment Division v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990) (USSC+)
Syllabus
Respondents Smith and Black were fired by a private drug rehabilitation organization because they ingested peyote, a hallucinogenic drug, for sacramental purposes at a ceremony of their Native American Church. Their applications for unemployment compensation were denied by the State of Oregon under a state law disqualifying employees discharged for work-related “misconduct.” Holding that the denials violated respondents’ First Amendment free exercise rights, the State Court of Appeals reversed. The State Supreme Court affirmed, but this Court vacated the judgment and remanded for a determination whether sacramental peyote use is proscribed by the State’s controlled substance law, which makes it a felony to knowingly or intentionally possess the drug. Pending that determination, the Court refused to decide whether such use is protected by the Constitution. On remand, the State Supreme Court held that sacramental peyote use violated, and was not excepted from, the state law prohibition, but concluded that that prohibition was invalid under the Free Exercise Clause.
Held: The Free Exercise Clause permits the State to prohibit sacramental peyote use, and thus to deny unemployment benefits to persons discharged for such use. Pp. 876-890 .
(a) Although a State would be “prohibiting the free exercise [of religion]” in violation of the Clause if it sought to ban the performance of (or abstention from) physical acts solely because of their religious motivation, the Clause does not relieve an individual of the obligation to comply with a law that incidentally forbids (or requires) the performance of an act that his religious belief requires (or forbids) if the law is not specifically directed to religious practice and is otherwise constitutional as applied to those who engage in the specified act for nonreligious reasons. See, e.g., Reynolds v. United States, 98 U.S. 145, 166-167. The only decisions in which this Court has held that the First Amendment bars application of a neutral, generally applicable law to religiously motivated action are distinguished on the ground that they involved not the Free Exercise Clause alone, but that Clause in conjunction with other constitutional [p*873] protections. See, e.g., Cantwell v. Connecticut, 310 U.S. 296 , 304-307 ; Wisconsin v. Yoder, 406 U.S. 205. Pp. 876-882 .
(b) Respondents’ claim for a religious exemption from the Oregon law cannot be evaluated under the balancing test set forth in the line of cases following Sherbert v. Verner, 374 U.S. 398 , 402-403 , whereby governmental actions that substantially burden a religious practice must be justified by a “compelling governmental interest.” That test was developed in a context — unemployment compensation eligibility rules — that lent itself to individualized governmental assessment of the reasons for the relevant conduct. The test is inapplicable to an across-the-board criminal prohibition on a particular form of conduct. A holding to the contrary would create an extraordinary right to ignore generally applicable laws that are not supported by “compelling governmental interest” on the basis of religious belief. Nor could such a right be limited to situations in which the conduct prohibited is “central” to the individual’s religion, since that would enmesh judges in an impermissible inquiry into the centrality of particular beliefs or practices to a faith. Cf. Hernandez v. Commissioner, 490 U.S. 680, 699. Thus, although it is constitutionally permissible to exempt sacramental peyote use from the operation of drug laws, it is not constitutionally required. Pp. 882-890 .
307 Or. 68, 763 P.2d 146, reversed.
Opinions
SCALIA, J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which REHNQUIST, C.J., and WHITE, STEVENS, and KENNEDY, JJ., joined. O’CONNOR, J., filed an opinion concurring in the judgment, in Parts I and II of which BRENNAN, MARSHALL, and BLACKMUN, JJ., joined without concurring in the judgment, post, p. 891 . BLACKMUN, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which BRENNAN and MARSHALL, JJ., joined, post, p. 907 . [p*874]

What does the government owe its citizens and when in turn does the citizen owe the government (whether stated or implied)?

Introduction
Primary sources are eyewitness accounts of historical events. As such, they are precious to historians since they provide a fly-on-the-wall glimpse of history in the making by those who witnessed that history.
Though I don’t expect you to be an expert on analyzing primary sources immediately, by the end of our course, you will be.
This assignment grows out of the article I assigned at the start of the semester — “Windows on the Past: Primary Sources and Why They’re Important.” (linked below) That reading contains two videos showing you how historians source their documents and the types of questions they ask about them. You cannot do well on this assignment unless you’ve read the earlier article and viewed the videos. They will help you in the work that lies ahead in the course.
What also will help you is reading the assigned reading for this week BEFORE you tackle this assignment. That reading that will give you the context or backstory to this document. That backstory will provide important clues to your understanding of this document. When I come to grade your work, I will look to see if you used the assigned reading in your primary source analysis.
The Question Set
As any respectable historian should, source the document. That is, who (or what) wrote or produced this source? How do you know? That is, independently confirm the authorship of the document by providing a link or links authenticating the document. Next, when was the source made? It’s important to know, as precisely as possible, what was going on at the time. Then list three important events from our history textbook that occurred at about the same time that this document was created.
In at least 250 words, summarize the key points of the source. Put your answer entirely in your own words. Quote nothing.
How does Roosevelt characterize the views of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson on government and democracy, and with which view does Roosevelt profess greater agreement? Does Roosevelt implicitly endorse either view in the remainder of his speech?
What are the “new terms of the old social contract” according to Roosevelt, and why has it become necessary to add these new terms?
What Larger Themes of those listed in the “Principal Themes in Our Class” *(linked below) does this source link to and shed light on? List and discuss at least two. If more linkages exist, discuss them. One is the “relation between the citizen and the government.” How does FDR view this relationship? What does the government owe its citizens and when in turn does the citizen owe the government (whether stated or implied)?
What is most memorable about this source for you – you personally?
The Assignment
Please read the following primary source as a historian might — in order to better understand the past. As you read, answer the questions in the Question Set as they pertain to this historical document.

Summarize the argument of the book in the first two paragraphs.

Summarize the argument of the book in the first two paragraphs. After the first two paragraphs, your response paper should be a mixture of analysis and summary. Use your response to raise questions; explore theoretical and methodological issues; connect the week’s reading to reading done in earlier weeks; identify critical gaps (as well as accomplishments) in the readings. Make sure you are using quotes and including the page numbers.

However, each group member is responsible for individually submitting an evaluation of self and group member participation.

Due Date: any time in Module 10 before 11:59 pm on Monday, October 31
Overview and Details: Throughout the course so far, we have been learning more about US history from an indigenous perspective up through the 1800s. To demonstrate what we’ve learned and continue practicing “historical thinking,” we will select a “primary source” and put it in historical context. You will be the historian who interprets the significance of the artifact based on our course materials and your own outside research. It is preferred that you work in groups of 4, just like with Group Project #1. One project and annotated bibliography will be submitted on behalf of each group by the Group Leader.
Directions: You and your group members will select 1 “historical artifact” or “primary source” to investigate. Since our class is online, remember that you are not required to physically meet with your group members, unless it is beneficial to you and your specific project. You and your group can coordinate and collaborate via email, phone, and/or Zoom. Your group will select a Group Leader who will help initiate communication and coordinate with group members. Each group member will take on 1-2 parts of the project criteria below, depending on how your group decides to divide up the work. There will be a Group Evaluation The Group Leader will submit 1 project and annotated bibliography on behalf of the entire group using the link provided in our Module 10 folder.
After your group has selected a “primary source” or “artifact,” research more about the artifact itself as well as its historical context:
1) Describe what the “primary source” or “artifact” is
2) Provide a thorough historical snapshot (contextualize where the artifact comes from historically based on outside research and module materials)
3) Connect to the “Danger of a Single Story”
4) Connect to at least 2 of our topics covered within Modules 1-10,
5) Analyze your findings using at least 3 of our key terms covered within Modules 1-10,
6) Reflect on the historical significance of the artifact itself and how it serves as a window into that historical moment
7) Reflect on how the artifact challenges/perpetuates the settler perspective of US history that is typically told
8) Lastly, create an MLA formatted annotated bibliography showcasing the research your group participated in.
Learning Goals: Through this project, we will experience firsthand how the past shapes the present as we zoom in on a “historical artifact,” analyze its historical context, and interpret its significance based on the history we’re learning. We will become more personally invested in our learning experience as we actively practice and apply historical thinking, engage with multiple perspectives and think critically about how historical narratives are created, and reflect on our own experiences along the way. Working together in groups will help us build more classroom community and connection while we practice historical thinking.
Group Details: You will work together in groups of 4, and you will select your own group members. Once you have your group established, you will select a group leader who will coordinate with group members and help organize tasks so that work is balanced between all group members. The group leader will also submit the project and annotated bibliography on behalf of the group. However, each group member is responsible for individually submitting an evaluation of self and group member participation. This will ensure that all group members have accountability and contribute equally to the project.
Format: Your group can showcase your findings in either essay format, PowerPoint, video, or any creative format your group prefers. There is no length requirement, as long as your project clearly addresses all parts of the prompt. (The more concise, the better! For example, essays around ~5 pages and presentations ~5 minutes.) In addition to your presentation/essay, an MLA formatted annotated bibliography showcasing the sources you used for research will be submitted. Only 1 submission required per group (with all names of group members included.) Even though there will be only 1 submission of the project, every group member should individually submit an evaluation of self and group member participation.
Key Terms: context, historical thinking, colonization, decolonization, firsting and lasting, doctrine of discovery, manifest destiny
Potential Artifacts: Here is a list of artifacts/primary sources that might be of interest. However, you are not limited to this list! If your group has another “artifact” idea, please email me for approval! Other ideas could be artwork, advertisements, newspaper articles, speeches, letters, etc. any time from the 1600s-1830s that connects to topics we’ve covered through Module 10.
John Smith’s Letter to Queen Anne on PocahontasLinks to an external site.
1616 Portrait of Pocahontas by artist Simon Van de PasseLinks to an external site.
Excerpts from William Bradford’s Journal “Of Plymouth Plantation”
Excerpt from Thomas Jefferson’s “Notes on the State of Virginia”Links to an external site.
Tecumseh’s Speech to William Henry HarrisonLinks to an external site.
Tecumseh’s Speech to the OsagesLinks to an external site.
1835 Political Cartoon of Andrew Jackson “The Great Father”Links to an external site.
Andrew Jackson’s “Second Annual Message”Links to an external site.
Andrew Jackson’s “Letter to the Cherokee”Links to an external site.
Cherokee Chief John Ross’s Letter Protesting the Treaty of New EchotaLinks to an external site.
Choctaw Chief George Harkins’ Letter to the American People in Response to RemovalLinks to an external site.
Project Ideas: Feel free to use the following questions as inspiration to guide your project/research.
Describe your group’s artifact as if explaining it to someone who is completely unfamiliar. Then provide a “historical snapshot” as you contextualize the artifact: who is the author/creator, what is the date, what is happening during this era? Where is/was the historical artifact showcased? How does the artifact reflect the ideology of the time? What significance does this artifact have to Native Americans or in connection to our course materials so far? How is history presented through the artifact (consider the tone, word choice, illustrations, and from what perspectives)? How does your artifact connect to the “Danger of a Single Story”? How does your experience/research connect to one of the topics covered in Modules 1-10? How does your experience/research connect to at least 3 of our key terms? Lastly, reflect on how the artifact either challenges or perpetuates how US history is typically discussed? As you take on the role of “historian,” what is the significance of a closer examination of the artifact you selected?

Why do they not succeed? www.democrats.org

Q#1 – What are the different types of Interest Groups? How do Interest Groups influence Elections? Use examples from previous elections when answering the question. What types of tactics are used to influence elections?
www.aarp.org
www.nra.org
www.aclu.org
Q#2 – Explain the importance of Political Parties. How have the 2 major political parties changed since 1932? What is the role of third parties in America? Why do they not succeed?
www.democrats.org
www.gop.org

What types of tactics are used to influence elections? www.aarp.org

Q#1 – What are the different types of Interest Groups? How do Interest Groups influence Elections? Use examples from previous elections when answering the question. What types of tactics are used to influence elections?
www.aarp.org
www.nra.org
www.aclu.org
Q#2 – Explain the importance of Political Parties. How have the 2 major political parties changed since 1932? What is the role of third parties in America? Why do they not succeed?
www.democrats.org
www.gop.org

Which of the five federalism powers involved here (express, implied, etc.)?

You are to find an article published in any newspaper, magazine, or credible online resource in the last two months regarding the balance of power between the state and Federal government. The article can discuss any issue (budgets, security, etc.) but it must include coverage of how the US Federal and state governments interact, or share power–and remember that sharing power can lead to either cooperation or conflict. Points will be awarded for this activity as follows:
You are to write a 350-word essay on the article. Your essay must include a summary of what the article says (in your own words), and answer these questions:
Is this an example of cooperative Federalism, or conflicting Federalism? Explain your answer.
Which of the five Federalism powers involved here (express, implied, etc.)? Explain your answer.
Are any kinds of grants involved? If so, what kind, and how much?
Is there a clear “winner” here– the states, the Federal government, neither, or both? Explain.Points will be awarded for this activity as follows:The essay concludes with a list of references (no points will be awarded if this condition is not met)
The essay is at least 350 words and demonstrates the proper use of paragraphs (no points will be awarded for this activity if these conditions are not met);
Your essay includes a summary of the article (0-2 points);
Your essay addresses each of the 4 questions above, with strong justification (0-8 points).
If you need the text book it is attached

How would you go about correcting uncle earl?

For this part of the project, students will answer this question in 5-7 thoughtful paragraphs (250 words minimum).
At a family reunion, your Uncle Earl says “I don’t see why the President has to ask Congress if it’s OK to send troop to Liberia. The Constitution says the President can do what he wants.” How would you go about correcting Uncle Earl?
This essay will also be used to assess your understanding of syllabus as indicated in the syllabus:
Points will be awarded for this activity as follows:
The essay is at least 250 words long and demonstrates the proper use of paragraphs (no points will be awarded for this activity if these conditions are not met);
If you used any references for this essay (in this case, they are optional), you put a link for each reference at the end of the paper.
Your essay answers the question thoroughly (0-4 points);
Your essay includes concepts taken from more than one chapter in the text (0-3 points);
Your essay included the use of relevant personal examples, or examples of how these concepts can be used in everyday life (0-3 points).
TEXT BOOK IS ATTACHED